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Te Horo Beach House

 

Living in the dunes

 

This house is sympathetic to its landscape but in an entirely different way to the former scheme.  Here the building is itself a part of the dunescape; long and low and nestled into the topography.  From the approach, the house blends into its setting unassumingly, its roof form following the natural gradient of the site. Silvery cladding references the driftwood piled upon the weathered coast, its orientation changing with the different activities within the home.

The plan is organised into public and private parcels of space - discrete ‘boxes’ quite separate from one another but unified by the strong monopitch roof form. Clerestorey windows frame the Tararua Ranges to the east and create the illusion of the roof soaring high and protective over the interior spaces below.  

To the north, the living spaces are oriented so to enjoy all-day sun all year round- a luxury made possible by recessing the floor plate into the high point of the designated dune. The battering of the site results in a natural-looking, sunny and sheltered courtyard to the north, hidden from view of the future neighbours. A second living room is bathed in morning sunlight and can close completely off to become a third bedroom if and when desired. To the southwest, picture windows frame Kapiti Island looming on the horizon, ensuring that it is always a part of daily life. 

A second ‘box’ houses the sleeping quarters - to the south of which is the master suite with walk-in wardrobe, ensuite, and views of the sun setting over the sea. To the east a private guest room opens onto a sunny courtyard. The final ‘box’ is a home for the car and outdoor recreation / sporting gears. Its position allows the potential for a future hot tub platform protected by the large southern eave. Sitting in the bath with only Kapiti Island as a neighbour - one really feels at home in the dunescape.


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